Three Tips for a Happier Holiday Season

Three Tips for a Happier Holiday Season

My staff and I took the week off for Thanksgiving, which I think will become a tradition at EFS. We all experienced some wonderful and rewarding family time.

With all of that Thanksgiving feasting behind us, the rest of the holiday season is now upon us. Take a deep breath. This month places a lot of demands on our executive functioning and time management skills. Here are three simple tips to help you access the joy of the season and slow down the sense of overwhelm that can happen in December.

Time Doesn't Stretch#1: Say “Yes” Less

Before you overbook yourself, respond to event invitations by saying “Thank you for asking. I need to check if that time is open.” Give yourself a pause to consider if this event is one to bring you joy or a sense of obligation. Remember, time doesn’t stretch. You can’t do everything with everybody. Go for the joy.

#2: Use Lists to Support Executive Functions

Busy times overload our working memory so lists can really help lower the stress in our brain. If you are buying gifts, keep a list of what you buy, the cost and where you “hide” it. I suggest wrapping a gift the day you bring it home. I keep my gift list in the Google Keep App on my phone.

#3: Make Time For Quiet

On your planner calendar, block out some time for renewal. Take some time to pause and count your blessings. Feeling gratitude raises the dopamine level in the brain, making it easier to connect to the joy of the season. This is a great tip to lower holiday stress! Consider what you can do to share your blessings with those less fortunate. Scheduling this time is often the only way to make it happen, so be proactive about self care and rejuvenation.

May you have a lovely holiday season!
Marydee, Veronica and Kathleen

The executive functioning success team

About the Author Marydee Sklar

Marydee Sklar is the president of Executive Functioning Success and the creator of the Seeing My Time Program®. She is an educator and author of three books on executive functions, as well as a trainer and speaker. Marydee has more than twenty years of experience working with students and adults with executive function challenges.

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